Hume David Green Thomas Hill Grose Thomas Hodge

Hume inherits from his predecessors several controversies aboutethics and political philosophy.

Hume's position in ethics, which is based on hisempiricist , is best known for asserting four theses: (1) Reason alonecannot be a motive to the will, but rather is the “slave of the passions” (see ) (2) Moral distinctions are not derived from reason (see ). (3) Moral distinctions are derived from the moral sentiments: feelings ofapproval (esteem, praise) and disapproval (blame) felt by spectatorswho contemplate a character trait or action (see ). (4) While some virtues and vices are natural (see ), others, including justice, are artificial (see ). There is heated debate about what Hume intends by each of thesetheses and how he argues for them. He articulates and defends them within the broader context of his metaethics and his ethic of virtue andvice.

Hume’s essays continued to be read widely for more than a century after his death. Jessop lists sixteen editions or reprintings of Essays and Treatises on Several Subjects that appeared between 1777 and 1894. (More than fifty editions or reprintings of the History are listed for the same period.) The Essays, Moral, Political, and Literary were included as Volume 3 of The Philosophical Works of David Hume (Edinburgh, 1825; reprinted in 1826 and 1854) and again as Volume 3 of a later edition by T. H. Green and T. H. Grose, also entitled The Philosophical Works of David Hume (London: Longmans, Green and Co., 1874–75; vol. 3, reprinted in 1882, 1889, 1898, 1907, and 1912). Some separate editions of the Essays, Moral, Political, and Literary were published as well, including the one by “The World’s Classics” (London, 1903; reprinted in 1904).

These bibliographical details are important because they show how highly the essays were regarded by Hume himself and by many others up to the present century. Over the past seventy years, however, the essays have been overshadowed, just as the History has been, by other of Hume’s writings. Although some recent studies have drawn attention once again to the importance of Hume’s Essays, Moral, Political, and Literary, the work itself has long been difficult to locate in a convenient edition. Some of the essays have been included in various collections, but, leaving aside the present edition, no complete edition of the Essays has appeared since the early part of the century, save for a reprinting of the 1903 World’s Classics edition and expensive reproductions of Green and Grose’s four-volume set of the Philosophical Works. In publishing this new edition of the Essays—along with its publication, in six volumes, of the History of England —Liberty Fund has made a neglected side of Hume’s thought accessible once again to the modern reader.

by Henry David Aiken (Free Press, 1975)Additional on-line information about Hume includes:

The Scottish philosopher, historian and essayist David Hume is known especially for his philosophical empiricism and skepticism. Hume conceived philosophy as the inductive, experimental science of human nature, building on the epistemology of the English philosopher John Locke, which enabled him to explore how the mind acquires knowledge. This comprehensive eBook presents Hume’s complete works, with numerous illustrations, rare texts appearing in digital print for the first time, informative introductions and the usual Delphi bonus material. (Version 1)

co., 1924), also by David Hume (page images at HathiTrust)

John Home, A Sketch of the character of Mr. Hume and Diary of a Journey from Morpeth to Bath, 23 April–1 May 1776, ed. David Fate Norton (Edinburgh: Tragara Press, 1976), p. 8.

Hume David Green Thomas Hill Grose Thomas Hodge

Includes  (1752), "My Own Life," by David Hume, and a letter by Adam Smith.

See, for example, Essential Works of David Hume, ed. Ralph Cohen (New York: Bantam Books, 1965); Of the Standard of Taste, And Other Essays, ed. John W. Lenz (Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1965); Writings on Economics, ed. Eugene Rotwein (Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1955); Political Essays, ed. Charles W. Hendel (Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1953); Theory of Politics, ed. Frederick M. Watkins (Edinburgh: Nelson, 1951); and Hume’s Moral and Political Philosophy, ed. Henry D. Aiken (New York: Hafner, 1948).

Hume David Green Thomas Hill Grose Thomas Hodge

The Books
A TREATISE OF HUMAN NATURE
AN ABSTRACT OF A BOOK LATELY PUBLISHED ENTITLED A TREATISE OF HUMAN NATURE ETC.
ESSAYS, MORAL, POLITICAL, AND LITERARY
A LETTER FROM A GENTLEMAN TO HIS FRIEND IN EDINBURGH
AN ENQUIRY CONCERNING HUMAN UNDERSTANDING
A TRUE ACCOUNT OF THE BEHAVIOURS AND CONDUCT OF ARCHIBALD STEWART
AN ENQUIRY CONCERNING THE PRINCIPLES OF MORALS
LETTER TO THE AUTHOR OF THE DELINEATION OF THE NATURE AND OBLIGATION OF MORALITY
SCOTTICISMS
FOUR DISSERTATIONS
THE HISTORY OF ENGLAND
DIALOGUES CONCERNING NATURAL RELIGION


Hume Essays - StudentShare

See John B. Stewart, The Moral and Political Philosophy of David Hume (New York: Columbia University Press, 1963); F. A. Hayek, “The Legal and Political Philosophy of David Hume,” in V. C. Chappell, ed., Hume: A Collection of Critical Essays (Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1966), pp. 335–60; Duncan Forbes, Hume’s Philosophical Politics (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1975); David Miller, Philosophy and Ideology in Hume’s Political Thought (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1981); and Donald W. Livingston, Hume’s Philosophy of Common Life (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1984).

In 1741 and 1742, Hume published his two-volume Essays, Moral and Political, which met with better success than the Treatise.

In this concise study, Nicole Brenez argues for Abel Ferrara's place in a line of grand inventors who have blurred distinctions between industry and avant-garde film, including Orson Welles, Monte Hellman, and Nicholas Ray. Rather than merely reworking genre film, Brenez understands Ferrara's oeuvre as formulating new archetypes that depict the evil of the modern world. Focusing as much on the human figure as on elements of storytelling, she argues that films such as Bad Lieutenant express this evil through visionary characters struggling against the inadmissible (inadmissible behavior, morality, images, and narratives).

David Hume Essays: Over 180,000 David Hume Essays, David Hume Term Papers, David Hume Research Paper, Book Reports

Also available in The Great Omission, San Francisco: HarperCollins, 2006; and Taking Every Thought Captive, edited by Don King, Abilene Christian University Press, 2011.